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CyberKnife® Patient Support Group > Ask the Doctors > AVM > C7-T1 (Cavernous, Venous?) AVM  Forum Quick Jump
 
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Meems
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   Posted 8/5/2005 11:00 AM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I am 24 years old and have just been diagnosed with a C7-T1 Cavernous Angeoma but I have also heard the doctors say Venous as well so I am not really sure which it is. I do not want surgery to remove this. Am I candidate for the CyberKnife and can it help me.

Post Edited (Meems) : 08/05/2005 07:23:26 PM GMT

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radsrus
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   Posted 8/5/2005 2:02 PM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Not many people have much experience with this lesion treated on the CyberKnife. There are probably several centers that do this, but I would contact Stanford. Yoiu can find contact information on the Accuray website.


Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
St. Anthony Hospital Cyberknife Center
(405) 272-7311
buddy@swrads.org or cmedbery@coxinet.net

Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
Southwest Radiation Oncology
1011 N. Dewey Ave.
Oklahoma City, OK 73102

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Steven Chang, MD
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   Posted 8/6/2005 7:28 PM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
If this is really a cavernous malformation, then it would not be typically treated with the Cyberknife or any other form of radiation. We know from experiences of treating these cavernous angioma (also known as cavernous malformations) that radiosurgery does not really work for these lesions. They are usually found after the hemorrhage, and using radiosurgery does not necessarily prevent these from rehemorrhaging again. Some cavernous angiomas can be associated with another abnormality called a venous angioma, which is a separate and distinct entity from cavernous angiomas.

Cavernous angiomas are really only treated with surgical resection. The risks of the surgery depend on the size and exact location of the cavernous angioma within the spinal cord, the clinical condition of the patient, and the experience of the operating team. Without having seen your films, I can only provide generalizations, and thus I cannot be more specific at this point.

Steven Chang, MD
Department of Neurosurgery
Stanford University
650-723-5573
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Meems
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   Posted 8/9/2005 8:24 AM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Thank you for your reply. My Neurologist has now told me the same thing. I really don’t want surgery on my spinal cord but unfortunately that may be the case. I just wish there was some other way.

These types of surgeries and the recovery sounds horrible. (this may be a question you cannot answer but here goes) How do I find a doctor that operates on these frequently if they are so rare. I want to come out having a normal life.

Also what is the Accuracy Website, and who should I contact at Stanford?

Post Edited (Meems) : 08/09/2005 04:22:38 PM GMT

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William S. Rosenberg, MD
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   Posted 8/9/2005 9:15 AM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Frankly, it’s very difficult to identify a surgeon with a lot of experience without actually making the appointment and asking. You are correct that there are very few surgeons with a lot of experience. I’ve been in spinal neurosurgery for a long time and know many people around the country. If you’d like, we can communicate by email and I could review some of the names you have.


William S. Rosenberg, MD
Medical Director, Menorah Medical Center CyberKnife
Midwest Neurosurgery Associates
6420 Prospect Street, Suite T411
Kansas City, MO 64132
(816) 363-2500
wsr@post.harvard.edu

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