CyberKnife Patient Support Group  

Welcome to the CyberKnife® Patient Support Group forum!
Please post your medical questions into the "Ask the Doctors" section to communicate with doctors whom are skilled users of CyberKnife. CPSG claims no liability for nor endorses any medical opinions or advice given by doctors on this site. Doctors participating on this board are all volunteers and are not financially compensated in any way.
For more information visit About the Doctors.

Click here to read a welcome message from John R. Adler, Jr., MD

  HomeLog InRegisterCommunity CalendarSearch the ForumHelp
   
CyberKnife® Patient Support Group > Ask the Doctors > AVM > my dad’s AVM  Forum Quick Jump
 
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> | Show Newest Post First ]

austinksa
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Nov 2005
Total Posts : 2
 
   Posted 11/1/2005 10:27 AM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
We recently found out my dad, 53yrs old, has an AVM, located on the front left side of his head. He went to work with a terrible headache and was soon after life flown to a hospital. He stayed about a week, all the while do various tests, mri, cat scans etc. and will be having surgery in 6-8wks. The only damage he has suffered this far is his speech (forgetting words, names, etc.) although he knows exactly what he wants to say. Whick is improving. My mom says it is worse when he is laying down. And he said he’s noticed food tastes alittle different. I am wondering what to expect with the surgery, the length, time in hospital, extent of everything. And what are the risks he will face? Is there any chance of a complete recovery? Any advice, or info is greatly appreciated. We are very very concerned. Thank you for your help in advance.
Back to Top
 

radsrus
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1419
 
   Posted 11/1/2005 11:03 PM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
It would not be fair for us to try to give you answers since we do not have all the information. However, your questions are very valid and reasonble and I would suggest you write them down and take them to the surgeons. They may not be abel to give exact percentages etd, but they definitely should be able to tell you what the risks are and give you some idea of how much risk there is. If they won’t discuss it with you, get different surgeons.


Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
St. Anthony Hospital Cyberknife Center
(405) 272-7311
buddy@swrads.org or cmedbery@coxinet.net

Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
Southwest Radiation Oncology
1011 N. Dewey Ave.
Oklahoma City, OK 73102

Back to Top
 

sue2u1
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Jul 2005
Total Posts : 1
 
   Posted 11/6/2005 6:23 PM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Hello,
So sorry to hear about your dad, my brother also has an AVM right frontal lobe, his is 5X7 he is 40 years old. He had a siezure 5/31/05. Since he had an embolization 9/15/05, his recovery has been slow, but they cut the blood supply 30 t 40%, he is schedule for another embolization 11/17/05. We are hoping they can get another 30 to 40%. Then we will only have a small AVM to treat with radiation or surgery. Why is your dad going to have surgery 1st? Did they discuss the option of embolization to make it smaller so it can be treated with radiation?

My borther has not worked since 5/05, he doesn’t have to many headaches, but his thought process it really bad, short term memory and a little problem with speech. We are hoping that after all the treatments his brain will repair itself. Dr. can’t really tell you how much better they will get, it’s all in the cards or God hands as we say.

Good luck with everything and know you aren’t alone in your quest for imformation in hopes to get the old dad, brothers, sisters and moms back. Many of them do seem to get back, but changed forever because of treatments or maybe its just the effects of know how fragile life really is?

Hugs, Sue
Back to Top
 

radsrus
Registered Member

Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 1419
 
   Posted 11/7/2005 2:58 AM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Treatment of AVM’s requires careful decision making by an experienced team. Embolization can be very useful but is not a cure-all or necessarily an easy way out. There is some concern that embolization can make part of the AVM obscured to angiography, and therefore potentially more difficult to treat with radiosurgery, but may not be permanent. Sometimes angiography is necessary for AVM treatment planning, but sometimes not. Embolization has been very useful when surgery is planned, or at least for our surgeons. Everyone should just make sure that their treatment team has all the options available and that careful planning of the entire approach is made in advance.


Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
St. Anthony Hospital Cyberknife Center
(405) 272-7311
buddy@swrads.org or cmedbery@coxinet.net

Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
Southwest Radiation Oncology
1011 N. Dewey Ave.
Oklahoma City, OK 73102

Back to Top
 
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
 
Forum Information
Currently it is Friday, June 30, 2006 2:28 AM (GMT -8)
There are a total of 5,385 posts in 1,230 threads.
In the last 3 days there were 15 new threads and 92 reply posts. View Active Threads
Who’s Online
This forum has 1237 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, mgh.
2 Guest(s), 1 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
Jerome J. Spunberg, M.D.