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CyberKnife® Patient Support Group > Ask the Doctors > AVM > cerebral avm question please  Forum Quick Jump
 
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jeanfrancq
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Date Joined Jan 2006
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   Posted 1/9/2006 12:28 AM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Dear Sirs,
I’am french (please excuse me for my written english) and I visited your web site. Actually I would like to ask you a question about cerebral arteriovenous malformation. Maybe you have the answer, even if it doesn’t concern radiosurgey directly.
After a complete and total obliteration of an avm thanks to embolization ( the result is confirmed six months later by an angiographic control), is the avm completly obliterated for the rest of the life, or may it bleed again?
I would really like to have an your answer. Thank you very much
Your faithfully
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radsrus
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   Posted 1/9/2006 2:32 AM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
In general, we consider it to be no longer a problem once there is angiographic proof of obliteration. However, with embolization there is some debate about how permanent the embolization will be, and it depends to a great extent on the material used for embolization. You should discuss it with your doctors since they have all the information.


Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
St. Anthony Hospital Cyberknife Center
(405) 272-7311
buddy@swrads.org or cmedbery@coxinet.net

Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
Southwest Radiation Oncology
1011 N. Dewey Ave.
Oklahoma City, OK 73102

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jeanfrancq
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   Posted 1/9/2006 2:44 AM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
thank you for your answer.
Actually, the material used was a cyanocrilate glue (excuse me for the translation).
Do you think this kind of material can obliterate the avm for life?
I am asking because I would prefer to have an american point of view. I think the research on this subject is more advanced in USA.
Thank you
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radsrus
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   Posted 1/9/2006 2:59 AM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Glue is said to be permanent. However, data from the Lariboisiere Hospital in Paris showed about a 12% risk of redevelopment of the AVM, usually within one year. Your doctors can tell you whether another angiogram will be indicated later.


Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
St. Anthony Hospital Cyberknife Center
(405) 272-7311
buddy@swrads.org or cmedbery@coxinet.net

Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
Southwest Radiation Oncology
1011 N. Dewey Ave.
Oklahoma City, OK 73102

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jeanfrancq
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Date Joined Jan 2006
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   Posted 1/9/2006 6:18 AM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
thank you again for your answer.
But could you tell me where I have to search to consult this data.
Actually my doctors tell me everything is ok but i was controlled just 6 month after the second embolization whic corresponds to the complete obliteration. They told we would maybe do an other control in 18 month, but I’m still a little bit afraid.
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radsrus
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   Posted 1/13/2006 3:50 AM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=PubMed

Just type in keywords and let it search. You may have trouble separating the wheat from the chaff.


Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
St. Anthony Hospital Cyberknife Center
(405) 272-7311
buddy@swrads.org or cmedbery@coxinet.net

Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
Southwest Radiation Oncology
1011 N. Dewey Ave.
Oklahoma City, OK 73102

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Steven Chang, MD
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Date Joined Aug 2004
Total Posts : 63
 
   Posted 1/13/2006 9:40 PM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
It is generally unusual for embolization to be the only treatment used to cure AVMs. In these cases the AVMs are typically small with only one or two feeding arteries. I agree with the need for another angiogram in the future. There is no set ideal time frame, but one to 2 years after embolization would be reasonable. In any case, Dr. Medbery is correct in that there is a low but real chance of recanalization of the AVM vessels following embolization.


Steven D. Chang, MD
Assistant Professor
Department of Neurosurgery
Stanford University School of Medicine
300 Pasteur Dr., Room R-225
Stanford, CA 94305
Tel (650)723-5573
Fax (650)725-5032

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